Copyright 2017 - Free Joomla Templates - SNABIRC-KENYA - Email: Info@snabirc-kenya.org, snabirc@snabirc-kenya.org
  • Emsos Village, Baringo County

    The C.E.O of  Snabirc-Kenya with a family in Emsos Village in Baringo County. This family lost a child in the year 2014 when a puff adder slid into their bed and bit the child on the nose bridge between the eyes. She died a short while later.

  • Emsos Village, Baringo County

    This Child, aged 7 years was bitten by a snake in the year 2014 with her sister as they slept in their home. She was fortunate to live but her sister died. This child is now disabled and she is developing paralysis in both legs. Before the snakebite, she was an active child who was about to go to pre-school, but now she cannot move on her own.

  • Emsos Village, Baringo County

    This Child, aged 7 years was bitten by a snake in the year 2014 with her sister as they slept in their home. She was fortunate to live but her sister died. This child is now disabled and she is developing paralysis in both legs. Before the snakebite, she was an active child who was about to go to pre-school, but now she cannot move on her own.

  • Emsos Village, Baringo County

    A young man shows his scar inflicted by a snake. The   Snake actually sunk its fangs into his arm and he had to wrestle to shake the snake off his muscle. He was very lucky because it was a dry bite. He escaped with deep bruises which resulted in the above scar.

  • Emsos Village, Baringo County

    This 5 year old girl was attacked by a snake at around 8 pm as the family prepared to go to sleep. She was rushed to a nearby health facility for emergency treatment. She was referred to a better facility the following day where she spent close to four months receiving treatment. She finally came out of hospital but with a disabled arm.

SNABIRC-KENYA is a non-governmental organization whose aim is to reduce the number of deaths and disabilities due to snakebites and snake attacks. Snake bite is a serious problem in rural Africa and access and availability of Anti-venom is not always guaranteed. We therefore work to alleviate their pain and hopefully save their lives and reduce mortality due to snake bites. SNABIRC-KENYA also hopes rehabilitates those that become disabled as a result of snake bites. The growing number of snake bites is attributed to human-animal conflict, environmental degradation as well as global warming. It is becoming a health as well an economic and social problem. According to the conflict resolution warden with the Kenya Wildlife Service, 680 cases of snakebites that resulted in 81 deaths and 577 injuries had been reported between 2003 and June 2009.These statistics have now changed since 2009 and rising cases present the ice tip of an underestimated problem.

Experts warn that these rising cases could be as a result of the warming climate which has enabled snakes to move to previously cooler habitats, clearing of forests and the worsening droughts that force the reptiles to go into people’s houses to look for water.

Families living in snakebite prone zones are now being advised to keep water outside their houses so that the snakes can get a share and avoid venturing into the houses. The only dilemma is these zones have water scarcity problems therefore there is none to offer to the reptiles.

As previously mentioned, the availability of anti- venom serum is not always guaranteed and when available the cost is beyond the reach of most people. Health officials and those from the KWS agree that past experiences of drug stock-outs in many government hospitals has made the public believe that a snake antidote is not available in government facilities and whenever they are bitten by a snake they opt for traditional treatment.


search